Category Archives: Arrows

Snow is Here

Here we are on the Oregon coast and it’s snowing.  It’s not supposed to do that here, but it is. Not much is sticking but enough so you can see it.

untitled-design untitled-design-3
We let out the dogs this morning and they went nuts; they are not used to snow and they love it. They were chasing each other around the yard like maniacs.  The Beagle (Logger) was chasing his buddie (Freddie Bear) one of our Labs and the Lab had to slow down so Logger could catch up.  They were barking their heads off having a great time and rolling in the snow.
cat-for-post

dog-for-post-3I love to watch them when they are chasing each other around in the back, we have a couple of acres that you can see in the back.  I can watch them go crazy all around the backyard. The other dogs we have (two more Labs) all get involved and it’s really fun to watch.  Fortunately we live in an area that doesn’t get very cold and snows very seldom and we can get in the car and go for thirty minutes and get into the snow when we want to. dogs-for-post

img_0148My faux son Austin lives in Alaska and it gets down to twenty below some of the time and one of my other sons, Seth, is also up in Alaska where he fishes for a living so we get to hear all about mucho cold weather all of the time, that’s close enough for me.  I used to not mind the cold weather, but unless I am hunting or doing something that keeps me moving or jumping around I just don’t like it much.  Nowadays I get to wear my parka and long-johns to keep warm.

untitled-design-4

We just got back from the Archery Trade Association Show in Indiana and the weather was about 12 or 13 degrees as an average low temp, with highs up to the low 20’s.  Back in Myrtle Point, while the temps are so low, we moved the cat and dog beds into the house.  It’s a thrill during feeding time with the barking and meowing not to mention us trying to get some chow in our faces, but it’s fun.

img_7548

img_7539It was fun at the ATA show, we got to show off our new products.  The carbon arrows Rose City Archery is selling really caught a few peoples eyes.  Of all of the new products we’ve introduced I like the footed shafts best, it’s really an opportunity to show off the talent we have working here. Our craftsman’s main objective is to put more weight forward in the arrow, this provides more energy in the shaft for more “killing power”.  It’s amazing to see how much more force is imparted in the arrow when you add that extra weight in the front part of the arrow.  Of course there are other ways to put some extra weight forward but they aren’t 15965606_1403434276356174_5022059601781014381_nnear as efficient as the footed arrow.  Plus they look great and fly super true so if you have some talent with the bow you can have more efficient and better arrow flight; actually footed shafts will make a better archer out of the person behind the bow.

screen-shot-2017-02-07-at-3-55-02-pmWe also have the Lumenoks that we are able to attach to a wood arrow; what this does is the nock end of the arrow lights up when you shoot the arrow so that you can tract the flight of your arrow and see where your point of impact is with the shot you just made.  If you are hunting you are able to see where the point of impact is and where that arrow strikes the animal. You’re able to track the animal by this light, it is something that makes you more efficient in recovering an animal after you have made the shot.  I believe this is a wonderful innovation in the archery world helping with the recovery of an animal.  Especially if you are tracking that animal after dark, battery life is good for forty hours so you have a decent period of time after the shot to recover the animal.

screen-shot-2017-02-07-at-2-20-01-pmRose City Archery is producing what we call “Carbon Footed aka Fusions” where we attach a carbon extension to the wood shaft, this allows the archer to be able to use any of the screw in attachments that are available to carbon arrow shooters.  This includes all of the different broadheads and other points that won’t fit on wood arrows.  Another new product we have re-introduced is RCA tapered shafts.   This allows the archer to use an 11/32 or 23/64 shaft and be able to use a 5/16 nock, which a lot of folks think they have better control of the arrow with the taper and the smaller nock.  New for 2017 is our extra long shafts, archers who have that 32” plus draw length found it difficult to find wood shafts long enough for their draw, we have provided the solution.  We have what you need and we want to make your archery experience better.  We have more new stuff coming soon so keep your eyes on this Blog and the newsletter for updates.

Thanks for listening and good shooting,

Jerry Dishion

PRES/CEO

 

Ride That Tiger

screen-shot-2016-10-31-at-1-07-08-pm

A couple of years ago I walked out in back of the mill and heard some noise coming from the back of one of the buildings on our property.  It’s kind of amazing I heard anything as the mill was running full blast and is pretty noisy around here when that happens.  I recall it was raining (can you imagine, in Oregon!) and I went over to investigate to see what in the hell it was. When I got to the back of the building I dug through the brush piles and came up with two baby kittens in a box meowing their cute little heads off.  Being the old softy I am I brought them into the office to show them to my wife and the other folks in the office.  Naturally we all stopped work for a while so everyone could “googoo and awwwww shucks” over the little guys.
Next I have to go get Martin who is our resident cat lover and has taken many kitties home to clean up and give away to his neighbors and relatives.  It seems like he has an endless supply of folks and relatives to give these cats to.  He is very careful who he gives the cats too and always tells us who is taking them off his hands, either that or he has a houseful of cats, Martin loves cats, his wife not so much.  OK, now he thinks I am going to give him these little monsters to get rid of, AhHa he is wrong.  We have a mouse problem here and I figure we can let these little guys loose here and give them some food and they will rid us of the mouse problem and I am screen-shot-2016-10-31-at-1-05-44-pmright (after all I am the Boss, so I have to be right, right?).  So I make the executive decision to keep the cats for mouse patrol.  It works out pretty good and the cats grow up and they’re munching up on the mice… I even find mouse “corpses” on my desk (taken over bait?) as a present when it’s not even my birthday or Christmas or any special occasion. All of this is OK with me because we no longer have a mouse problem, you can actually put down your lunch and not have to re-inspect for mouse droppings or even a live critter hoping around in there which has happened a couple of times.  I mean we had a mouse invasion here, it was nothing to walk in and see the mouse’s scattering like cockroaches when the light comes on.  But the kitties are getting fat and happy, plus the mouse problem is under control.  If you think real hard you can guess the next line in this progression, everyone seems to be happy except the mice and guess what?
rca-kittyWell the ladies in the office decide we are being cruel to the mice by turning them into cannon fodder to the cats.  What?  “You can now eat your lunch in piece, it’s safe from the mice cause there ain’t no mice, at least inside which is all I care about.”  Plus we have these cute little cats hanging around, laying on your desk and purring at you, snuggling up to you and all in all making the office and the whole plant a happier and healthier place for us all. Except we now have a problem with some folks thinking we are being mean to the mice, sorry girls, live with it!
A couple of weeks ago we come in and the arrow production people are in a turmoil, one of the cats has been murdered and there it is curled up on the floor bleeding and basically yelling her head off.  So off I go in a panic to the vets and he says well this critter has been in a fight with a bobcat and lost, but she got away and came back.  Crap Doc how much is this going to cost, he tells me and I collapse, but my wife convinces me to get the cat fixed.  I am telling you this animal looks bad, she’s got blood coming out of a few orifices that didn’t used to be there, but she looks pretty pathetic and as I said before I am a softy.  So I tell the Doc OK go for it.  We have to leave the cat there and come back in a couple of days and see what’s up. So we do and when we come back we have a one eared bald cat and the Doc says he is not sure if this critter is going to make it.  Well that was 3 weeks ago and here she is getting back to being fat and happy.  We of course are broke, but what the hell we were broke before so those things haven’t changed much.

img_0887Why am I telling you folks all of this? I just wanted to show you what the instinct for survival can do, this little guy was well on her way to being a Bobcats lunch and she fought her way out and got back here to us and survived.  The Vet calls her the miracle cat, he was sure she was history, but she wasn’t ready and fought back and now she is getting right back to her old self.  When you look at the pictures here you

img_0891Don’t see the half of it.  She had her whole head bandaged, and her stomach wrapped because she had claw and tooth marks all over her head and neck, back, just everywhere and had to have many stiches to close up the holes.  She looked like she just came back from a part in a Zombie movie.  She used to live here at the plant, but now she lives with us until she is full back on her feet then we’ll bring her back permanently, I’m just afraid she will get outside in the bushes and meet up with the monster who caused all the trauma.  She “Rode That Tiger” and came out on the other end. So we bring her in every day to visit with her sister and the crew who are all her buddies.

Now that I think of it we do have a few things to do with Rose City to drop in your thought pattern….. Maybe I can get you thinking of RCA and what’s new here. We are just putting the finishing touches on some new things. We now make Footed Shafts and they’ll be available starting Nov. 1, 2016.  Also, we will have wood arrows with Lumenok lighted nocks.  Last but not least we now carry carbon shafting and we offer them in all of the styles that we offer wood and at the same prices as an introductory offer.  Also the Carbons will be available as Bear Arrows as well, Bear Archery has decided to allow us to produce Carbons with the Bear logo on them and that we are very proud of.  So check out our site and take a look at our new stuff, I think you’ll like it.

Thanks for listening,

Jerry

Summer Time

Summertime

IMG_1873

We just got the garden planted and I’m beat.  We decided to put in a new type of garden, it’ called a “straw bale garden”.  It’s really neat, what you do is get a bunch of straw bales and set them up in rows then you put plants right in the straw bales.  Then you water and add some fertilizer and all of the vegetables grow right in the straw. According to the book it’s easy but the book is full of crap.  First you wrestle (50 ea.) 70 pound bales of straw into your truck to bring them home.  When you get to the farmers who has a 12 year old kid throwing these bales around like they weighed 10 pounds, me and my 30 year old son are struggling with, I convince myself it must be a matter of technique.

IMG_1875

We get them home a put them into whatever type of configuration has been decided upon by “SHE” who must be obeyed (my wife).  Then you have to prepare the bales for about 12+ days with nutrients and lots of water until you begin to get mushrooms growing, then you are pretty much ready to go.  Then you have to set up a watering system and did I tell you about the ground cover you install first and of course you have to put wire, small chicken wire to keep the moles and gophers from chewing their way up through the bales to gobble up your veggies when (if) they grow.  I forgot about the 8’ deer fence around the whole thing after which I got to roto till the whole area, well if the veggie’s are going to grow in the bales why roto till the ground?  Well some of the veggie’s have roots that will grow deeper than the thickness of the bales and if you don’t roto till they will get root bound and then all your work goes down the drain.  Trust me on this one, you don’t want your work to go away because it is an incredible amount of work and mucho sweat.  Just to get the first little plants to raise their little heads above the soil takes a few weeks of hard work, but it’s fun.  The older I get the more I appreciate hard work, especially when I’m the one doing it.  OK so now we have a month and a half into this a project and we see our little veggie children popping their collective little heads up above the straw and we have enough cash into this to buy veggie’s for at least a year, and another years worth of vegetable stuff.  But we’re off to the races, were rolling right along and most importantly my wife is happy.

IMG_0752

Now I just came back from lunch and the plants are happy, happy, happy.  I just saw our first flower on a squash plant, the tomatoes have little baby tomatoes on them and some pretty good sized ones too and they are covered with flowers; woo-hoo, nothing like fresh tomatoes right out of the garden.  Now if we can keep the stupid dogs off the bales, keep them from eating all of the fertilizer and berries off the Blue Berries and the raspberries the minute they get a little red or blue.  Squash blossoms are in mortal danger the minute they bloom and our pooches spot them, that soil must taste pretty good.  You don’t use any dirt, you exfoliate all of it and remove any traces of dirt from around the plants.  Now, you may ask why is old Jerry doing all of this stuff to get a few veggies he could just a easily buy at the store when the time is right.  Well I’m going to tell you right now if you’ll listen.  (A) My wife wanted to do it and I’m her slave and this makes my life much easier and pleasant.  (B)We get great vegetables, the tomatoes don’t taste like saw dust, and the strawberries are wonderful.  They are sweet like they were when I was a little guy.  (C)Plus my archery targets are right by the garden for a little well needed practice.  (D)Lots of good exercise and I can’t think of any reason not to.  (E)Now a straw bale garden is not supposed have any weeds which will be wonderful because the garden grows in the bales and not the dirt so there is no opportunity for weeds to get a foot hold….I hate weeds.  In a normal garden you spend most of your time weeding and that takes a lot of the enjoyment out of the garden for me.

IMG_0740

OK, Now we have the garden going and growing and even glowing, everything is clippity clopping right along and life is good, or so I think.  Actually I had forgotten about all of the critters out there who like to eat vegetables just like we do and now we have an onslaught of squirrels, raccoons, skunks and other assorted mammals and birds who are just starting to drive us nuts.  Fortunately our doggies just love to chase these furry and feathered guys out of the garden area.  Our Beagle; Old Logger, he starts to bugle and the Labs join right in and they don’t care what time it is.  They look at their job is to keep the AO clear and they intend to do it. Of course the neighbors might not agree on the time schedule, but our pooches look at it this way, as WTF, they have a job to do and they’re going to do it.

The dogs each have kennels and sleep in our room in them and when the time to bark comes around they bark, they don’t ask permission they just do it, if your sleeping well OK get ready.  I believe this will all turn out OK, if we can just get some sleep, it will.  The plus side is I have some archery targets right by the garden and I can sneak out and shoot a few arrows for my breaks.  I did see a couple of nice bucks the other day, just outside our fence at our house.  So who knows this all may turn out well.

IMG_0706

We just got back from a friends wedding in Alaska and while we were there we got to see our son who has been up in Homer, AK commercial fishing for the last six years. The wedding was great and to visit with our son was even better so things are going well this summer.

Thanks for listening and we’ll see you soon.

Good Shooting,

Jerry

Ode to the Hunt

 

Ode to the Hunt

Ode to the Hunt

We took this photo to represent a reflection of the overall hunting experience…because it’s about the journey that led us here, to this very spot in the wild. This may be the successes, the frustrations; the countless hours of scouting, studying, practicing, planning; the rhythmic lapping of river water against a Coleman canoe; the pre-dawn, headlamp-guided walks into your deer stand; the light wind current and thermals causing your breath vapors to rise and drift as you exhale into the frost-bitten air; the welcome sounds of the woods and sweet absence of man-made chatter; the sudden rush of a mature, commanding whitetail buck confidently coming into your calls or your rattling horns; the silent time when your mind wanders and you contemplate your life and how your living it, judging yourself; when thoughts of your loved ones and truest friends are interrupted by a rutting buck that offers a perfect broadside bowshot that will aid in a clean ethical kill; the decision to pass or deliberately take the shot; your selfless buddies that help you without gripe or question; the comfort in knowing that your supportive family understands why you hunt and the satisfaction of knowing that same family will be eating protein-rich backstraps that The Lord provided…but only after the work is done. All those grand experiences that lead to the collective moment when you realize that it’s not about me, and you lower your head in humility and thankfulness. Then your smile grows big and you take some more photos with a deer that you honor, respect, and are proud to have harvested. Ode to the hunt.

-Luke Strommen

A highlight of the journey

A highlight of the journey w/ Bear Archery Custom Kodiak and Rose City Fancies

Western Pronghorn “Antelope” hunting- coming soon!

My friend and fellow traditionalist Adam Morehouse is no stranger to hunting Montana’s variety of big game. After shooting a recurve for several years, he decided to further challenge himself by picking up a longbow a few years back. He capitalized rather quickly by hunting Montana’s early archery antelope season. The end of a grueling spot and stalk on the Montana plains found Adam’s arrow buried deep in the vitals of a monster 73″ antelope buck! The following month found him tagging out on a nice 145″ 5×5 whitetail with his stick and string in hand. The following season found Adam again tagged out on this nice Antelope buck after a mid-afternoon hunt just ten days into the season!

image

After stating that he was much smaller than last year’s monster goat, I assured him that any antelope taken with any type of bow, let alone a longbow, is a true accomplishment. Many believe the antelope is the hardest North American game animal to stalk and harvest with a bow.

Here are a few cool facts about the American Pronghorn, or otherwise known to most as simply an Antelope, even though it’s not really an antelope at all: A mature pronghorn buck will weigh 100 to 120 pounds (with exceptional individuals being a few pounds heavier); their lungs are very large for their size, and their hearts are double the size of that of animals of comparable weight; Their front feet are larger than their rear feet because their front feet hit the ground the hardest while running and support most of their weight (mature bucks front hooves may be about 3″ with the rear hooves being about 2 ½”); a nerveless cartilaginous padding on the bottom of the forefeet cushion the strike of the feet at high speeds (a reason why antelope seldom show lameness or tenderfootedness); they have no dewclaws which may be a hindrance to speed on rough or rocky terrain; the ligaments, tendons, and bones of the lower leg fit together so perfectly that it is nearly impossible for the Pronghorn to suffer leg injuries over broken terrain; a Pronghorn usually runs with its mouth wide open which often fools the observer that it is winded- this is not the case however as it is actually pulling in great drafts of air which its nose cannot accommodate…the windpipe is oversized to easily accommodate such air flow to its large lungs…; which are in fact twice as large as that of several animals of double the weight!

Dubbed the “Speed Goat” for good reason, the antelope is the fastest animal in North America. Reaching speeds of 60 miles per hour ranks this nimble and quick, graceful animal only second to the Cheetah in the world. It is believed that one can top 70 mph in short bursts. Groups of Pronghorn Antelope have been clocked traveling together at 50 mph across the plains.

image

Known for their extreme awareness of their surroundings, they are often described as nervous, flighty creatures. Their eyesight is phenomenal, but they are a very curious animal which can lead to the demise of an unsuspecting antelope checking out a white flag placed out by an eager hunter. Although this is a small percentage of the way some Pronghorns are harvested, I do have friends that have tagged several this way and have brought in a few myself using a few feet of Charmin (Ultra I think…). Waterholes are the general favorite when it comes to bowhunting these beautiful Kings of the Plains. A hunter can sit patiently in a dugout, homemade blind, pop-up blind, or other hide-out (stock tanks, windmill enclosures….) within effective bow range of a favorite watering hole hoping for the opportunity at one of the wary buggers. If I was to guess, I would say this is how most antelope are taken by bow. Although, the decoy method during their rutting period around the beginning of September, or any week before and after, seems to have become just as popular. Besides the traditional spot and stalk, decoying a Pronghorn within bow range is one of the most challenging, yet exciting, ways to hunt them. I have missed several trying to maneuver a shot and keep an old-school decoy from tipping over because it won’t stick in the hard rock or dried gumbo of Northeast Montana. And oh yea…the Pronghorn have amazing primal reflexes to a hunters incoming arrow. Modern advances in game animal decoy technology have taken crazy great strides in the last decade or so, creating incredibly lightweight, super realistic, and extremely effective decoys that are much lighter, easier to use, and simple to pack with you during your hunt afoot. The folks at Montana Decoy (www.montanadecoy.com) can set you up with decoy that is sure to bring in a speed goat and get you that heart pumping adrenaline rush that comes standard with that experience. I’ll keep you updated on this season’s quest to bow-harvest an American Pronghorn Antelope, one of our continents most unique game animals.

Shoot Straight-  Luke Strommen

 

Rose City Archery Factory Tour Video

We are Rose City Archery the world’s largest wood arrow manufacturer, join us on a factory tour with Jerry Dishion Owner and CEO.   All arrows are handmade from wood found here in Coquille Valley near Myrtle Point Oregon, we use %100 percent of the wood byproduct from the arrow making process. For more information about our other cedar products, arrow building supplies, arrow orders, FAQ’s, etc check out http://www.rosecityarchery.com.

Inexpensive DIY Archery Target

As I have journeyed into traditional archery I have needed to acquire more tools and gear. I wanted to start shooting and practicing in my back yard, but needed a target to shoot at. As much as I wanted an awesome 3D elk target, my budget and girlfriend were not approving. Also I just spent extra money on a top notch Bear bow and arrows setup so didn’t want to drop another $70-$100 on a target. I thought about a hay bale but that would get wet and not last that long, plus leave a mess. Then I started looking at the targets online and thought I could make my own. I searched around on the internet and found tons of options for DIY archery targets. So that afternoon I decided to make my own. While I was out at Costo, I asked if they had any left over or extra boxes and pallet wrap. Surprise surprise, Costco had tons and let me take what ever I wanted. While I was there, I got $7 worth of duct tape to add some waterproof capabilities to the cardboard box. I took it home and put it all together in 2 hours. While the finished target is very rough and not the most beautiful target in the world, it only cost $7! Plus I got to choose the target size I wanted and the patterns. It lets me practice more often in the back yard and save on driving to and entry fees at archery ranges every time.

Free Cardboard Box & Pallet Wrap

Free Cardboard Box & Pallet Wrap

Cutting & Assembling

Cutting & Assembling

Stuffing the Target

Stuffing the Target

Finished DIY Inexpensive Archery Target

Finished DIY Inexpensive Archery Target

The target performs great! It stops the arrows even when I am at full draw at 5 yards away. Also the arrows are easy to remove with just one hand. While I love getting into the sport of traditional archery, my wallet doesn’t. This project just proved to me that I can use my creativity, the internet, and asking around to not let my budget stand in the way of becoming a better traditional archer.

-Jon Dykes

Rose City Archery – Pro Staff